Creating reports in R #Code

I’ve recently been consolidating a lot of R code from different parts of my analysis into one file. I wanted to add good documentation and explanation of results and interpretations along with my code to make sense of it later. I came across this option of creating dynamic reports that can combine our code, custom text and R output to an output document using the knitR package in R. I find it a good practice to create such reports for any analysis (wish I followed this earlier), so here’s a post on how to create them. They are very useful coz of the following reasons:

  • It is a great option to generate PDF, HTML and word reports by combining our text explanations, code, R output and graphics at one go. It saves the hassle of saving and copying text, code, output and figures separately into a report.
  • We can easily share the file with someone else with the output and explanations.
  • It is much easier to generate a new report dynamically when the input file changes, as it runs the same code and generates new output report based on the new file at one go.

How to create dynamic reports in R?

The first step is to create a R Markdown file (with the extension .Rmd). If you’re using RStudio, you can go to File -> New File -> R Markdown to create a Rmd file.  You should specify whether you want an output in html, pdf or word. It generated the following skeleton code for me as I specified an output pdf file:

Rmd parts
Rmd parts

Alternatively, you can write the sections in R and save it as .Rmd file. The Header section begins and ends with three dashes (—). It contains title, date and author attributes and specifies the type of output document: E.g. html_document for html web page, pdf_document for a pdf file, word_document for Microsoft Word .docx etc. The header can include other options as needed: “runtime: shiny” if it should be run as an interactive shiny app, “css: styles.css” to change the stylesheet when working with html, “toc: true” to include a table of contents etc.

The following code contains instructions along with R code to create a simple html document. It should be pretty self-explanatory to follow instructions and edit the code as needed for your own use:

The html file created by the above code can be accessed here to view how the corresponding output is generated:

Sample Markdown file in R

 

Useful resources:

https://yihui.name/knitr/

https://www.rstudio.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/rmarkdown-cheatsheet.pdf

 

 

 

Adding CKEditor to webpages in PHP #Code

What is CKEditor

CKEditor is an open source, customizable web text editor that can be integrated to our webpages. It can be used in three different modes (Article editor, Document editor and Inline editor) for content creation. I was looking for a web editor like Google doc using which I can collect text data from students (but not requiring login with gmail), and I found CKEditor doing exactly what I wanted to do. I’m using it here as a web document editor.

In this blog post, I’m combining a few steps I did to integrate CKEditor to my webpage. This is the code I wrote after a few rounds of trial and error and many rounds of looking up on the CKEditor documentation and StackOverflow. Wish I found a blog like this when I was trying to implement this 😉

Setting up CKEditor

CKEditor is available for download here. I used the Standard package of the current stable version  (Version 4.6.2 • 12 Jan 2017). All you have to do is to copy the folder ‘ckeditor’ from the downloaded zip file to your program files folder and you’re ready to go. The main steps are below:

Include ckeditor.js in the head section of your code:

Create a text area for the editor in the body section followed by your CKEditor instance:

This simple full code renders you a CKEditor with the default configuration options (Default toolbar, width, height etc. – All of these can be customized). Continue reading “Adding CKEditor to webpages in PHP #Code”